Tag Archives: google plus

Social Networking: Is It Conversation Or Curation; What About Conversion?

The onset of social media has brought a revolution of content. What many had buried in their minds, stored in their pockets or recorded on tape is now able to be broadcast in real time. With today’s powerful social networking tools in hand, how can you know the best way to promote yourself, your business’ ideas? And to what end?

For the sake of this post we’ll focus in on two processes (conversation and curation) and one “end product” (conversion) used within social media.

Conversation, in its purest sense, is interacting with others so as to share and gain ideas and experiences resulting in a more harmonious and congruent relationship. Conversation can take many forms and is exercised by all of us everyday. When it comes to online interaction, it is no different.

Three walls have been broken down with communication over social networks (especially on Twitter and Google Plus): geography, demographics and economic status. The playing field is leveled when it comes to interactions. For example, a low income citizen can build an impressive online reputation, getting the attention of high-profile executives and celebrities. For example, look at Daniel Starkov from Ruse, Bulgaria. He is a college student living in a small city along the Danube River. He now has over 40,000 followers on Twitter and offers a great platform for guest blogging.

Curation is best illustrated by observing entrepreneur Guy Kawasaki. The guy’s (no pun intended) a virtual fire hose. And with his creation of Alltop, it’s one of the supreme sources to discover what’s being talked about.

You may not be able to tweet interesting or bizarre links every few seconds like Kawasaki, but if you know your niche it’s possible to deliver good, trustworthy references to a growing captive audience.

Conversion, for businesses, non profit organizations, and individuals alike, is the pinnacle of social media. Whether it’s the sale of your coffee, a visit to your site resulting in revenue, or a link being passed along by many people—everyone has a goal to bring their followers into deeper engagement.

Whether you choose conversation or curation for building a reputation on social media, you can be sure that you’re efforts will be rewarded. However, the most effective, in my opinion, is to apply both methods and play with the balance between them. Watch how your audience responds to both and make the necessary adjustments to either converse or curate more. In short, allow your customers to be your gauge for how your virtual reputation is shaping up.

Even though we all desire to have that one tweet, Facebook post or blog entry to go viral, it is more the exception than the rule. Faithful interaction with your followers and friendly recruiting of newer audiences will guarantee a group of humans who not only follow your branding but will eagerly promote it among their circles.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Which Social Network Would Mister Rogers Prefer?

You remember the red sweater, the putting on and removing of shoes routine? What about the trolley that would arrive upon his beckon call? Mister Rogers entertained kids for nearly two generations, bringing a multitude of lessons to the ears of little ones with ease.

Mister Rogers of Mister Rogers' Neighborhood

Courtesy of Pennstatelive

Having passed away of stomach cancer on February 27th, 2003, he just missed the onset of the social media revolution. Let’s say, theoretically, that he was still alive today and active on social platforms. Which one would he prefer? Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus? Would he be engaged online at all? Maybe he would hire someone younger to handle it? Would he feature Mark Zuckerberg on his Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood program?

Why do I ask what Fred, the shoe-tying guru, would prefer when it comes to staying connected? Because he is the epitome of simple, transferable, yet profound teaching lessons that many of us grew up with.

Instead of me babbling on, let’s hear your input by way of a poll

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

How Google Plus Is Causing Institutions To Rethink Social Media ‘Restrictions’ And Three Reasons Why This May Be A Good Idea

Yesterday I was excited to perform a Foursquare check in at my children’s school, but much to my demise, the site was blocked (Auughhh!). I then checked my gmail account and wondered, out of curiosity, if I could get on Google Plus. Surprisingly I could, realizing that for the school to shut down Google Plus they would have to block Google all together, including that major backbone—Google search. Hmmmm, what a conundrum the school board must feel over this.

Google Plus Social Media Badge

Does this mean we smirk at institutions who block social sites and go our merry way interacting, no holds barred, on Google Plus? No, it does not. However, as you may or may not have come into contact with these restrictions where you work (or your children attend classes), these social media ‘restrictions’ are becoming increasingly more painful (and I believe detrimental to educational and professional development).

Ten years down the road, the ITs and policy makers at these institutions may wake in a cold sweat regretting the fact they COMPLETELY blocked the social web. Don’t get me wrong, I do believe there is a place for social media monitoring with children. We cannot let them freely interact with just anyone—we need to be engaged with students and help them discover the benefits of social networking. Here are three specific reasons I believe social media should not be completely restricted:

  1. The reliance on social media for relationships and business will only grow more important – As social media is becoming more and more intertwined with higher education and business, individuals are going to be expected to have more of a grasp on these mediums when looking for employment.The true innovators of the web—young entrepreneurs like Mark Zuckerberg and many other change agents under thirty years old have more than likely been inspired or learned tricks of their trade from online communities, not just the unlinked classroom.
  2. Institutions choosing to block social media on the inside, yet utilizing it on the outside to promote themselves is a bold, hypocritical move – Why hire a social media marketing agent or encourage a staff member to socially promote to the outside world when no person internally can utilize it? Do the online conversations that brought that new student or employee into the company have to stop the moment they set foot in the door?
  3. If computer Internet use is being taught to kids in schools, why, must I ask, do school administrators feel they must cut access to the most up-to-date resources discovered mainly through social media? – How do we discover the latest news, breakthroughs, and changes in society today? Pulling the plug on properly accessed feeds like Twitter will tend to put young students ‘in the dark’ when it comes to learning how to stay current. Teachers, I am sure, are interacting with each other via social networks and even obtain lesson plan ideas via links to videos and articles from social channels. Must I say more.

The launch of Google Plus has seemingly caught many institutions by surprise, leaving them to scratch their heads at how to throttle this new platform. How school boards choose to move forward with this dilemma, whether to block Google all together or realize they must take more of a proactive teaching stance on the integration of social media remains to be seen.

For now, this battle over who and when people interact on social networks inside institutional walls is percolating new questions and new issues that will not be easily answered.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Five Secrets To A Balanced Business and Personal Social Media Presence

When you operate as a social media ghostwriter, it can be difficult to keep up your own social networking. Days will come where you feel as though you’ll pull your hair out over it. What are effective methods to deal with this constant tension? Well, here are five secrets that I’ve learned from my own experience:

  1. Don’t feel too pressured to maintain the same barrage of updates as with your paying clients – If you’re a freelancer like me, when you’re posting social updates ‘off the clock’ it almost feels like a waste of time. Remember, you’re still growing your visibility and networking even with one to three quality updates per day.
  2. Spending time on your own social media updates can be therapeutic (and strategic) – Writing a personal update via Twitter about your hectic workday or even the fact that you’re falling behind on freelance work can not only feel like an emotional weight lifted, but may reward you with sympathy or timely advice from the social community. Not only will it bring your blood pressure down, but you may generate new connections over your honesty and emotional approach.
  3. Be intentional to carve out time for updating your own social profiles – I find that if I wait until other work is completed before I tweet or post a link on Facebook that it never happens. Force yourself to put up an update before beginning your freelance or other business-related marketing.
  4. Turn it into a conversation by asking the community – Tweet or post about your dilemma and wait for the social media community to offer their collective wisdom. And, as mentioned above, you might be surprised at the growth of followers who have either been afraid to publicize their emotions or are ready to branch out from their own group of confidantes.
  5. Some of your social connections could benefit the company you work for – It’s very possible, as has happened to me, that a person or two in your social circles could benefit your client. Whether it’s website design, legal services, financial advice or the like, it could prove to be a powerful and natural networking technique.

If you’re new to social media marketing, realize it will take time to adjust to the intensity and breadth of growing followers around the particular branding of the company you represent. Even though it may feel like you’re emotional energy is being sapped by building their business, it doesn’t have to detract from your own presence on the web.

Finally, it is possible that some of the links (a cool viral video) you’re using for work could be very useful and relevant for your own social network; content that you otherwise would have never discovered on your own.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Three Concrete Ways To Engage With Tech

Today, it’s easy to get inundated by everything tech. How do you filter through the clutter? Where do you start? How do you navigate the ever-growing URL pool? Some have resorted to staying with desktop software alone. Others, merely taking suggestions from family and friends. Still others have given up altogether and resorted to pen and pencil thinking.

What way is best? If the power grid were to collapse, I suppose the latter thinking could prove the viable option. However, nobody knows the outcome of tomorrow.

How do you stay up on what is affecting you and your business (or organization) without defaulting to extremes? Obviously, each person should test the waters and see where their threshold lies, but here are three tips for engaging with tech:

1. Don’t assume the way you use the web today will define the way you use it tomorrow – A term that comes to mind for this tip is ‘Social Media.’ Who would have thought, even five years ago, how much this medium would define our lives. With over 700 million Facebook users and an ever-growing Google Plus crowd, people from children to grandparents have an insatiable appetite for relationship and sharing. If we were using the computer and the web exclusively circa 2000, much would be missed from news to the latest dog grooming styles.

2. You learned to ride a bicycle, didn’t you? – Childhood is defined by new experiences and a constant intaking of new information, experiences and relationships. I just have to watch my own children to be reminded of tireless exploration. What happens as we get older? Why do so many resort to habitual lifestyles that refuse to engage outside a certain structure? I’m not here to get into the psychcology of the matter, but to remind that we need to be proactive at learning once out of college. There is so much to explore and experience, and the Internet brings it to our lap (literally).

3. Watch the younger generation – If you’re older, especially over fifty, tech can be more of a challenge because you didn’t grow up with it. It was introduced when in your thirties and became an adjunct, not integral part of your life. Tips for your generation: watch your kids and others in the younger demographic for how they use the web in everyday life. You may feel exhausted at all the uses (and the gadgets they carry), but you can glean some ideas from the ‘fire hose’ examples. For example, you may not have realized that you can utilize Twitter as a notepad to keep track of thoughts. Need to locate a group of people fast? Use Facebook to organize a group and search for names to connect with. Need to keep track of time on some projects? Use Toggl for time and project management. The list goes on and on…

Let this be a catalyst for action, not a post for paralysis.

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,
%d bloggers like this: