Category Archives: Marketing

Social Media Engagement And Conversation Through The Eyes Of A Homeless Guy

How can I possibly have any impact or voice when my pocketbook margin is so thin? I wish my resources equaled _________ dollars so I can start a movement that matters. Why aren’t my videos and posts going viral so I can make mega bucks off of advertising? If Google got there start in a garage, why does it feel as if I’m never going to get away from the oil puddles and have a ‘real’ company?

Are questions like these beating up on your self confidence? Have you grown jealous of social media buzz centered around people who have made it big through viral content, who have the advantage of constantly being in the public eye, or have cashed in on a previous venture allowing them to “coast.”

To help with wrestling with this painful issue, a short film entitled Change for a Dollar (watch below), depicts a homeless man who turns heads by taking his donated change to impact others. He “provides” for them in unsuspecting and well thought out ways (planting a coin before a help wanted sign, hands exact change to a young woman so she can make that one call home, etc.).

Here are four insights from the point of view of the homeless man depicted in the film:

1. He was observant and from the way the film plays out, he appeared to be well-connected with most of the persons he assisted.

2. He began his day like any other, however, at a certain point he put his available strength and resources into selfless action by meeting the needs of others at crucial junctions in their lives.

3. Limited resources do not and should not stifle creativity, but rather empower it. He could have helped each person by simply handing them money. He did not, but operated from a thought-out plan to provide for a need and awaken a sense of mystery in each recipient.

4. He returned to the spot he began, not expecting a major change to his situation but content to serve others from what was entrusted to him.

In today’s economy, more and more people can relate to feeling “impoverished” compared to what was enjoyed yesterday. But, this does not have to bring paralysis. In fact, new ideas are best birthed out of pain.

Relationships today are complex, with many being started and even sustained via social media. How can these principles be applied to social networking conversations and even to blog posts?

Get to know the audience. The time invested to shows care, drawing them out on what is important to them will enable to know how to best meet their needs.

Resisting the temptation to “blanket” communication. In other words, being very careful of the campaigns performed to build followers or to snag the interest of current followers. It’s not the form itself that will build a trusted audience, but how to deliver value with the campaign being used simply as a tool in the long-term relationship.

Courageously engaging friends of friends. Just as the homeless man set out the coin, knowing it would gain the attention of the boy, his intention was to get the mother to notice the “Help Wanted” sign in the window. He used an indirect approach through trusted relationships of that friend.

Losing the sense of entitlement that these friends will build business (and a portfolio). The homeless man did not go back to each of these individuals and later ask for money as a payback. He merely went to his post and waited to see what would come his way.

Many more lessons can be drawn from this ten minute film. What impressions would you add?

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Social Networking: Is It Conversation Or Curation; What About Conversion?

The onset of social media has brought a revolution of content. What many had buried in their minds, stored in their pockets or recorded on tape is now able to be broadcast in real time. With today’s powerful social networking tools in hand, how can you know the best way to promote yourself, your business’ ideas? And to what end?

For the sake of this post we’ll focus in on two processes (conversation and curation) and one “end product” (conversion) used within social media.

Conversation, in its purest sense, is interacting with others so as to share and gain ideas and experiences resulting in a more harmonious and congruent relationship. Conversation can take many forms and is exercised by all of us everyday. When it comes to online interaction, it is no different.

Three walls have been broken down with communication over social networks (especially on Twitter and Google Plus): geography, demographics and economic status. The playing field is leveled when it comes to interactions. For example, a low income citizen can build an impressive online reputation, getting the attention of high-profile executives and celebrities. For example, look at Daniel Starkov from Ruse, Bulgaria. He is a college student living in a small city along the Danube River. He now has over 40,000 followers on Twitter and offers a great platform for guest blogging.

Curation is best illustrated by observing entrepreneur Guy Kawasaki. The guy’s (no pun intended) a virtual fire hose. And with his creation of Alltop, it’s one of the supreme sources to discover what’s being talked about.

You may not be able to tweet interesting or bizarre links every few seconds like Kawasaki, but if you know your niche it’s possible to deliver good, trustworthy references to a growing captive audience.

Conversion, for businesses, non profit organizations, and individuals alike, is the pinnacle of social media. Whether it’s the sale of your coffee, a visit to your site resulting in revenue, or a link being passed along by many people—everyone has a goal to bring their followers into deeper engagement.

Whether you choose conversation or curation for building a reputation on social media, you can be sure that you’re efforts will be rewarded. However, the most effective, in my opinion, is to apply both methods and play with the balance between them. Watch how your audience responds to both and make the necessary adjustments to either converse or curate more. In short, allow your customers to be your gauge for how your virtual reputation is shaping up.

Even though we all desire to have that one tweet, Facebook post or blog entry to go viral, it is more the exception than the rule. Faithful interaction with your followers and friendly recruiting of newer audiences will guarantee a group of humans who not only follow your branding but will eagerly promote it among their circles.

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How Google Plus Is Causing Institutions To Rethink Social Media ‘Restrictions’ And Three Reasons Why This May Be A Good Idea

Yesterday I was excited to perform a Foursquare check in at my children’s school, but much to my demise, the site was blocked (Auughhh!). I then checked my gmail account and wondered, out of curiosity, if I could get on Google Plus. Surprisingly I could, realizing that for the school to shut down Google Plus they would have to block Google all together, including that major backbone—Google search. Hmmmm, what a conundrum the school board must feel over this.

Google Plus Social Media Badge

Does this mean we smirk at institutions who block social sites and go our merry way interacting, no holds barred, on Google Plus? No, it does not. However, as you may or may not have come into contact with these restrictions where you work (or your children attend classes), these social media ‘restrictions’ are becoming increasingly more painful (and I believe detrimental to educational and professional development).

Ten years down the road, the ITs and policy makers at these institutions may wake in a cold sweat regretting the fact they COMPLETELY blocked the social web. Don’t get me wrong, I do believe there is a place for social media monitoring with children. We cannot let them freely interact with just anyone—we need to be engaged with students and help them discover the benefits of social networking. Here are three specific reasons I believe social media should not be completely restricted:

  1. The reliance on social media for relationships and business will only grow more important – As social media is becoming more and more intertwined with higher education and business, individuals are going to be expected to have more of a grasp on these mediums when looking for employment.The true innovators of the web—young entrepreneurs like Mark Zuckerberg and many other change agents under thirty years old have more than likely been inspired or learned tricks of their trade from online communities, not just the unlinked classroom.
  2. Institutions choosing to block social media on the inside, yet utilizing it on the outside to promote themselves is a bold, hypocritical move – Why hire a social media marketing agent or encourage a staff member to socially promote to the outside world when no person internally can utilize it? Do the online conversations that brought that new student or employee into the company have to stop the moment they set foot in the door?
  3. If computer Internet use is being taught to kids in schools, why, must I ask, do school administrators feel they must cut access to the most up-to-date resources discovered mainly through social media? – How do we discover the latest news, breakthroughs, and changes in society today? Pulling the plug on properly accessed feeds like Twitter will tend to put young students ‘in the dark’ when it comes to learning how to stay current. Teachers, I am sure, are interacting with each other via social networks and even obtain lesson plan ideas via links to videos and articles from social channels. Must I say more.

The launch of Google Plus has seemingly caught many institutions by surprise, leaving them to scratch their heads at how to throttle this new platform. How school boards choose to move forward with this dilemma, whether to block Google all together or realize they must take more of a proactive teaching stance on the integration of social media remains to be seen.

For now, this battle over who and when people interact on social networks inside institutional walls is percolating new questions and new issues that will not be easily answered.

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